Serious Tip - Don't Go Back to the Moon

Covered in Raptors. Long Story.

verysharpteeth:

zombres:

Raleigh Becket, the most manly of men, an absolute wall of muscle was just brought to his knees by a woman half his size. Dude bros take note, because instead of being mad or even thinking it was funny, which would have undermined him taking her seriously, he’s impressed. He’s beyond impressed. He doesn’t even scramble back up after she steps back. He stays on his knees. She won the point and he’s in no hurry to try to reassert himself. His grip even tightens on the staff because there are some serious emotions going on here with him. The wandering knight just found his warrior queen and he’s trying to figure out how to process that information. He’s found the piece he’s been missing for so long and there’s a little of that last expression that looks like he wants nothing more than to throw his arms around he waist and be “thank GOD you found me because I’ve been alone so long”.

(via mmmcoconut)

allofthefeelings:

bccabarnes:

I used to really hate the scene in CA:TFA where Peggy storms off after catching Steve and Pvt Lorraine, you know, the one where Steve accuses Peggy of fucking Howard. I used to want to scream “MY BB STEVE WOULD NEVER” because Steve ugh stop being an idiot you’re better than this. But I started thinking about it and honestly, no matter what excuses my gut wants to make, Steve is clearly not better than this. He has some shitty attitudes that he falls back on in moments of weakness. My fave is problematic in a way that makes sense, but he’s called out on it, and I like that better.

(Although tbh, I wish there had been a scene where Steve explicitly apologizes for being a jerk, along with more Howling Commandos footage.)

People tend to be quick to forget what it’s like to have it tough when they have it easy, and I think this is a scene where Steve really forgot where he came from. Steve had the super-soldier serum magically to turn him into the “ideal man,” and suddenly, for the first time in his life, he’s taken seriously. He’s riding high on people rewarding his bravery instead of bashing his face in for it. 

But Peggy? Peggy’s exactly the same as she was before she met Steve. She still has to work twice as hard as her colleagues to get maybe half the recognition. She has to prove to her superiors that she deserves her job every single day. She has to fight for her place in the military structure, for the assignments she’s more than capable of doing. She’s put blood, sweat, and tears into her work, and she thought she found a kindred spirit in Steve. Not only that, but she wants to believe that Steve is better than everyone else. After all, if there’s one man like Steve, and if Steve can find people he trusts, maybe there are actually more men like Steve, and maybe things are starting to look up for Peggy.

So when Steve pulls that shit, she’s just disappointed. 

People have been treating him like a Perfect Soldier, i.e., a Real Man (TM) for months now. They’ve had him acting the part for so long that he probably started to believe it. Before, he became accustomed to being trampled over, shoved to the side, overlooked, etc., so he’s not used to having the power to hurt people. I don’t even think it occurred to him that’s a thing that could happen after the serum. He assumed that he could stay the same by acting according to what he feels is right based on how people are treating him (like he always has). What Steve failed to notice is that by nature of receiving his new body and the superhuman physical power that came with it, he was also given incredible amounts of social power, such that the world is no longer picking fights with him. He has to learn that he’s not always in the right just by nature of who he is anymore. And Steve fucks it up, not because Steve himself is a failure or a bad person, but because he forgets.

Because you don’t just become a good person because someone tells you that you have the capacity for it. A good man person is not something you are simply by nature of being. It’s not even about making a choice to be a good man, or wanting to be one. It’s series of choices that you have to be continually making.

So THANK GOD for Peggy standing up to Steve, for getting in his face and saying, “check yourself before you wreck yourself, Rogers.”

Oh man, I really like this reading, particularly because I’ve always liked this scene and now I more fully understand why.

Erskine sets up “a good man” as almost a binary: it’s something Steve has, something other soldiers lack, a reason Steve is chosen and they are not. But when Peggy calls him out here and identifies that being a good man is contingent on circumstances (things that worked when he was seen as unprivileged may not work the same now that he has privilege) and is also a constant process rather than a default state, she becomes an instrumental part of his origin story and his hero’s journey, not as the love interest or as the goal, but as the moral center of the character who’s seen as the moral center of the Marvel universe.

(via mhalachai)

ellidfics:

liveship:

spuzz:

ellidfics:


Chris Evans doing his own stunts on “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”…

He’s also clearly doing the bulk of the fighting in the footage they’ve released so far.  Ditto the rest of the cast - they really went out of their way to make this as real as possible.

Forever reminded of the commentary for The First Avenger where they discuss how Chris Evans moves and runs and how unique it is, how much it’s like a dancer (because he did dance as a kid and he brings that shit naturally) and how they eventually decided to try and have him do as much as possible, especially the running, because his physical characteristics and movements are really hard to duplicate. That clearly carries over to The Winter Soldier.
Who Chris Evans is and how he moves, is now who Steve Rogers is and how Steve Rogers moves. I think he demonstrates that even more in this movie with all the extra training he went through and the input he had on the fighting style and shield use. Not to discount the awesome and vital work from the stunt people, though, who are an integral part of the whole thing. And they had their work cut out for them trying to match the uniqueness of Chris. I’m sure they did it perfectly.

I love how in one of the featurettes for TFA they talk about how Chris’s physicality informed the motion of the shield and not the other way around, how he gave them the movement and that determined how the shield was thrown and handled in general.
I just really cannot imagine how anyone else could’ve been Steve Rogers, he plays him so well on both an emotional and physical level in ways that are so subtle (because that in itself is Steve) that I don’t think casual viewers even fully appreciate it.

And it fits in perfectly with 616 Steve, who was not only a superbly trained commando, but a skilled gymnast whose fighting style was acrobatic, graceful, and fluid.  MCU Steve fights like combat is a deadly ballet, and it’s wonderful to see, especially in that battle on the Lemurian Star.

ellidfics:

liveship:

spuzz:

ellidfics:

Chris Evans doing his own stunts on “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”…

He’s also clearly doing the bulk of the fighting in the footage they’ve released so far.  Ditto the rest of the cast - they really went out of their way to make this as real as possible.

Forever reminded of the commentary for The First Avenger where they discuss how Chris Evans moves and runs and how unique it is, how much it’s like a dancer (because he did dance as a kid and he brings that shit naturally) and how they eventually decided to try and have him do as much as possible, especially the running, because his physical characteristics and movements are really hard to duplicate. That clearly carries over to The Winter Soldier.

Who Chris Evans is and how he moves, is now who Steve Rogers is and how Steve Rogers moves. I think he demonstrates that even more in this movie with all the extra training he went through and the input he had on the fighting style and shield use. Not to discount the awesome and vital work from the stunt people, though, who are an integral part of the whole thing. And they had their work cut out for them trying to match the uniqueness of Chris. I’m sure they did it perfectly.

I love how in one of the featurettes for TFA they talk about how Chris’s physicality informed the motion of the shield and not the other way around, how he gave them the movement and that determined how the shield was thrown and handled in general.

I just really cannot imagine how anyone else could’ve been Steve Rogers, he plays him so well on both an emotional and physical level in ways that are so subtle (because that in itself is Steve) that I don’t think casual viewers even fully appreciate it.

And it fits in perfectly with 616 Steve, who was not only a superbly trained commando, but a skilled gymnast whose fighting style was acrobatic, graceful, and fluid.  MCU Steve fights like combat is a deadly ballet, and it’s wonderful to see, especially in that battle on the Lemurian Star.

(via mhalachai)

evilsupplyco:

If you are an artist, when you get stuck, draw bigger and on tracing paper when you are stuck. Consider this manual photoshop. Use scissors, trace, refine.

If you are a writer, when you get stuck, get a pad of paper and at least two colors of pen that contrast. When you get stuck, use your “replace this with actual language later” color. Just write what you want to say. “Make angry hero cry as villain drinks amazing latte. Figure out words later.”

If you get stuck in life, clean up your area and think about how big, and how small, the universe is. Either direction is practically infinite, suspending you in the middle.

If you are fey, remember when you weren’t. It will build compassion when you deal with mortals.

If you are a potato, please advise us how you use the Internet. We have so many questions, sentient spud bud.

(via waxjism)

davidesky2:

An Indian version of The Golden Compass by Assaf Horowitz, via Character Design Page.

(via hellotailor)

This is about one woman trying to save the life of another woman, and having to confront the dreaded patriarchy in this patriarchal world. And all the worst of the male gender is going to be put in Clarice’s way. - Jonathan Demme

She’s been the lone woman in a sea of men her whole life…she’s been the one that was the smaller one her whole life, so she’s comfortable in that position. And in some ways, that’s what makes her the hero of the film. - Jodie Foster

(via waxjism)

When you’re at the pool lounging on a beach chair and some little kids are running and the lifeguard screams out “no running” do you respond “excuse, not all of us are running”? No, you don’t. The lifeguard didn’t have to specifically state who they were talking to because you’re intelligent enough to comprehend that the comment wasn’t being directed at you.

Found a quote that shuts down that “not all men” argument pretty well. (via mykicks)

AHaha. haaaa. hh.

(via thefeministbookclub)

(via waxjism)

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

wintercyan:

everyworldneedslove:

Oh, jeesus i did not realize it was the SAME PLACE and now it hurts SO MUCH WORSE.

)

It’s where Steve asked Bucky to come with him. Steve’s sitting there in the bombed-out ruins thinking about that night, about Bucky’s easy smile and the way he’d said “that little guy from Brooklyn who was too dumb not to run away from a fight, I’m following him,” wishing he could turn back time.

Bucky’s tour was up. Wounded in battle, he’d had a sure ticket home, but he stayed for Steve. Because Steve asked him. Because Steve asked him in that bar.

Steve is sitting there, in the same chair, Bucky’s chair next to him empty. He’s not just drinking to Bucky’s memory, he’s drinking with Bucky’s ghost.

(via jerakeenc)